THINGS TO KNOW: Episodic Genres

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I recently received an audition from an actor for the show Rectify. If you are familiar with the show, then you already know that it is specific and subtle. Rectify is a slow burn and very southern. The actor who auditioned was southern, but most actors work hard to get rid of their southern accent, replacing it with what we refer to as a standard Amercian dialect/accent. This versatility in speech is mandatory for any proficient actor. Just because we work in the south does not mean that every tv or film project is inherently southern.

However in the case of Rectify, they are almost always looking for a southern accent. In fact, casting often notes that if you are not southern, they do not want you to attempt it. For those of us who are southern, there is nothing worse than a bad imitation of what southern is and sounds like. This particular actor added in a very strong southern accent, and the audition itself was over the top, aka BIG. It was not submitted. We watch every audition that is turned in to casting for both quality and to be sure that all of casting’s instructions are followed.

When I reached out to speak with the actor, give feedback and explain why we had not submitted it, I asked if he had seen the show. The actor said no.

You should not submit an audition on a show without having viewed a trailer or clip of it at the very least. It is best to watch a few episodes. The show does not need to be your favorite, but you need to know the genre and style of the piece in order to bring that to the audition. I would argue that this is as important a tenet of acting as knowing your objective or who you are talking to in the scene.

If you are working and living in the southeast, then you should be familiar with every show that shoots here. There is a ridiculous amount of really good television on right now. I cannot keep up with all of the shows I want to watch, but I do not attempt to submit on projects that I have not watched.

If the show is new, then get on the internet and do some research. If it is not new, you should still get on the internet. It is an amazing resource that is right at your fingertips. Use it. Know what you are auditioning for–know the story, the characters, the feel of it. Do not simply rely on the information provided to you by your agent. Do your homework.

And, what I say today, may not be true tomorrow. 

Image Credit: Tracy Thomas/Unsplash

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